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Children's Medical Services - Special services for children with special needs
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Infant Toddler Development Training
Module 4, Lesson 5

Transitions

Another important area we need to explore before ending this module is transition - or the big T. Transitions are a part of life for everyone, but for infants and toddlers with special needs to move smoothly from one caregiving setting to another requires the team to provide selected strategies that meet the toddler's and family's needs.

Read Transition is more than a Change in Services: The Need for a Multicultural Perspective. This material can be found in the Resource Bank.

family playing soccerThe authors summarize their article by proposing 5 critical factors in meeting the needs of young children with disabilities and their families from culturally and linguistically diverse groups. Look at each one and work back through the article to locate examples of how each of these five factors is important to each of the three phases of transition.

These five factors (5C's) are critical in meeting the transition needs of young children with disabilities and their families from culturally and linguistically diverse groups.

  • Community Context
  • Collaboration
  • Communication
  • Family concerns
  • Continuity

Phase I Preparation: What should you keep in mind about: 1) community context, 2) collaboration, 3) communication, 4) family concerns, 5) continuity to ensure this phase is successful and to move smoothly on to the next phase?

Phase II Implementation: What should you keep in mind about: 1) community context, 2) collaboration, 3) communication, 4) family concerns, 5) continuity to ensure this phase is successful and to move smoothly on to the next phase?

Phase III Follow-up, and evaluation: What should you keep in mind about: 1) community context, 2) collaboration, 3) communication, 4) family concerns, 5) continuity to ensure this phase is successful and to ensure there is a continuation of the services and smooth transition into the next setting?

Use the following case study of Bill to practice embedding desired cognitive behaviors

Bills Case Study

Bill is a 34 month old toddler with Down syndrome. He lives with his mother and father and older brothers - Greg, 10 years, and Roy 8 years. He was also born with a heart anomaly, but at 18 months had heart surgery. He continues to have concerns related to his heart, vision, and hearing. He also has frequent upper respiratory infections. Bill wears glasses but has trouble keeping these on as he is very active. His hearing loss limits him from hearing friends.

Bill's parents have considered using sign language, but are not sure this is right for him. Because both parents work, Bill spends 7 hours a day in an inclusive child care setting and he loves his friends at school. His parents hope he can continue at the center until he is ready for elementary school and hope he can go to school with his typically developing peers.

Other information:

  • He likes to paint
  • He loves any outdoor play
  • He has trouble with transitions from activity to activity
  • He often points to things he wants rather than verbalizing even if can utter the words
  • He often gets frustrated with small blocks or peg boards and scatters these.

Scores from Assessment

Behavior Month's Score
Expressive language 24
Fine motor 27
Self-care 23
Receptive language 22
Social 20
Gross motor 26

 

Question: How would you model and coach Bill's child care provider to start a block building activity for Bill and two other peers?

Question: How would you

  1. establish rapport?
  2. build the caregiver's confidence?
  3. demonstrate or model the tasks?
  4. listen and support (active listening)?

Question: Would you use different strategies with Bill's mother than you did with the child care provider? Which ones and why or why not?

 

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