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Information Regarding Salmonella Outbreak

By Florida Department of Health, Office of Communications

October 09, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 9, 2013

Contact: Communications Office
(850) 245-4111

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ISSUES INFORMATION REGARDING SALMONELLA OUTBREAK

TALLAHASSEE—The Florida Department of Health has confirmed one case of salmonellosis, linked to Foster Farms chicken, has affected an individual in Florida. The Department is working together with the CDC and USDA in the ongoing investigation.

“Individuals who have eaten the suspect chicken and experience symptoms like diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps should seek medical attention,” said Dr. Anna Marie Likos, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection Director. “The Department will continue to monitor the situation and inform the public as new information becomes available.”

Salmonellosis is an infection with Salmonella, a group of bacteria (germs) that can cause illness in humans. Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection.

Salmonella infections usually resolve in 5–7 days and often do not require treatment other than oral fluids. Persons with severe diarrhea may require rehydration with intravenous fluids. Antibiotics are not usually necessary unless the infection spreads outside of the intestines.

What can I do to prevent salmonellosis?

  • Cook poultry, meats (including ground meats) and eggs thoroughly. Using a meat thermometer is the only way to be sure you have cooked meat to a proper temperature.
  • Do not eat or drink foods containing raw eggs or raw (unpasteurized) milk.
  • If you are served undercooked meat, poultry or eggs in a restaurant, don't hesitate to send it back to the kitchen for further cooking.
  • Wash hands, kitchen work surfaces and utensils with soap and water immediately after they have been in contact with raw meat or poultry. Use one cutting board for raw animal proteins and another for other foods to avoid cross-contamination.
  • Be particularly careful with foods prepared for infants, elderly, and immunocompromised.
  • Wash hands with soap and water after handling reptiles, birds, or baby chicks and after contact with other pets or pet feces.
  • Avoid direct or indirect contact between reptiles (turtles, iguanas, other lizards, snakes) and infants or immunocompromised individuals.
  • Do not work with raw poultry or meat and handle an infant (e.g., feed, change diaper) at the same time.

For more information, visit: http://www.floridahealth.gov/diseases-and-conditions/food-and-waterborne-disease/index.html

Or, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at: http://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/

The Department works to protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county and community efforts.

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