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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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Japanese Radiation Accident Information

Contact Environmental Radiation

Health Advisory: Japanese Nuclear Emergency Poses No Current Threat to Florida Residents

The routinely monitored, highly-sensitive network of trace radiation monitors around the state are not picking up any radiation levels that would pose a health threat. Additionally, water samples are routinely taken and tested as a part of the Florida Department of Health's nuclear power plant environmental surveillance program. None of these samples have registered outside of normal levels. For more information about the Florida Department of Health's radiation monitoring, please visit the Bureau of Radiation Control (BRC).

Based on these results and the careful, ongoing evaluation of the nuclear power emergencies in Japan by state and national authorities, the department is advising that there is NO current radiation or nuclear health threat to Florida residents. The immediate danger of radiation exposure remains with those in Japan who are within the defined regions of the nuclear power plants.

The department is also NOT recommending the use of Potassium Iodide (KI), or any other protective measures for Florida residents at this time. For more information about KI, read the KI Fact Sheet.

For answers to the most Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), please read Health Questions and Answers—Japan Incident. For more information on this and other radiation topics related to the Japanese accident, see the links below.

U.S. Federal Government

  • USA.GOV—The central clearing house of information from all the US government agencies about the Japanese nuclear emergencies. In addition to having direct links to all the federal government agencies listed below, this site also has good summaries of the information available at each agency.
  • FDA—The Japanese Radiation page at the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Based on current information, FDA is stating there is no health risk to the U.S. Food Supply.
  • NRC—The Japanese Radiation page at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NRC licenses and regulates all of the nuclear reactors in the US, and has provided personnel and assistance to Japan with the Fukushima reactors.
  • CDC—The Japanese Radiation page at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. CDC also has a new FAQs page on Iodine-131 Found in Surface Water (rivers, lakes, rainwater, etc.), which indicates there is no current health threat to US residents.
  • DOE—The Japanese Radiation page at the U.S. Department of Energy. DOE has released data recorded from its Aerial Monitoring System as well as ground detectors deployed in Japan. That data has been collected, analyzed, and posted on the DOE web site.

Florida's Nuclear Power Plants

Florida has a total of 5 nuclear reactors, located at three nuclear power plant sites around the state. None of these reactors are of the same design as the reactors at the Fukushima site in Japan, and all are either functioning normally, or are in a shutdown status. All of the Florida sites are licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  • Crystal River Unit 3—Information from the NRC about Crystal River Unit 3 reactor.
  • St. Lucie Unit 1—Information from the NRC about St. Lucie Unit 1 reactor.
  • St. Lucie Unit 2—Information from the NRC about St. Lucie Unit 2 reactor.
  • Turkey Point Unit 3—Information from the NRC about Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor.
  • Turkey Point Unit 4—Information from the NRC about Turkey Point Unit 4 reactor.
  • Progress Energy—Information from Progress Energy, owners of the Crystal River nuclear power plant.
  • FPL—Information from Florida Power and Light, a subsidiary of NextEra Energy, owners of the St. Lucie and Turkey Point nuclear power plants.
  • FDEM—The Radiological/Nuclear Power Emergency page from the Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM). FDEM has also provided this PDF about Nuclear Incident preparedness in Florida.

National Professional Organizations

Several national professional organizations with expertise in radiation matters have provided information about the Japanese reactor accidents and radiation safety.

  • HPS—Information about the Japanese accident from the US Health Physics Society (HPS), a scientific organization formed in 1956 of professionals who specialize in radiation safety in academia, government, medicine, research and development, and industry. In addition to it's Fukushima page, HPS also maintains a Nuclear Power page which includes a wealth of unique links, including one to a rare video tour inside a nuclear power plant. HPS also runs another web site containing scientific and objective answers to all types of everyday radiation questions in a friendly, easy-to-read format at www.RadiationAnswers.org
  • CRCPD—Information about the Japanese accident from the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), a national, non-governmental partnership of state radiation control programs dedicated to radiation protection.

Japanese & Other International Organizations

Several Japanese and other organizations around the world have provided information about the Japanese reactor accidents and radiation safety.

  • IAEA—Information about the Japanese accident from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).
  • TEPCO—Information about the Japanese accident from the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the owner of the Fukushima nuclear power plant.
  • MEXT—Information about the Japanese accident from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Sports, Culture, Science and Technology (MEXT).
  • METI—Information about the Japanese accident from the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

Note: This page contains materials in the Portable Document Format (PDF). The free Adobe Reader may be required to view these files.