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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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Tick-borne Diseases

Contact the Florida Department of Health

Ticks are an important disease vector in the United States. Preventing tick bites is the best way to avoid becoming ill.

• Apply repellent that contains 20 to 30 percent of DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) to prevent ticks from attaching to your skin.Other repellents registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may be found at http://cfpub.epa.gov/oppref/insect/. Always follow product instructions!

• Permethrin can be used on clothing, shoes, tents, and gear, and remains protective through several washings. Clothing pre-treated with permethrin is also available at many outdoor stores.

• Check your body and your child's body for ticks after spending time in a place where ticks are likely to be found such as wooded areas or places with tall grass and leaf litter.

• Check your pet for ticks.  Talk to your veterinarian about products that keep ticks off your pets.

• Dress so your skin is covered in light-colored clothing when you are in an area when ticks might be present. This makes ticks easier to see.

• Prevent tick infestations around your home by landscaping your yard to be a tick-free zone.

• Shower soon after being outdoors. Showering within two hours of coming indoors has been shown to reduce your risk of being bitten by a tick.

• Tumble clothes in a dryer on high heat for an hour to kill remaining ticks. (Some research suggests that shorter drying times may also be effective, particularly if the clothing is not wet.)

• Walk in the center of the trail

• Avoid wooded and bushy areas with high grass and leaf litter.

For more information, see Prevention of Tick-borne diseases

Other Tick-borne Diseases

African Tick Bite Fever

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