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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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Vaccine Preventable Diseases (VPD)

Contact: Florida Health


Vaccine-Preventable Disease Surveillance Report February 2019

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A activity increased from last month and has been above the previous 5-year average. 232 cases were reported in February 2019.
  • Hepatitis A activity increased from last month and has been above the previous 5-year average since April 2018.
  • 265 cases were reported in March.
  • Drug use was the most commonly reported risk factor.

Pertussis

Pertussis activity decreased from last month and was below the previous 5-year average. 21 cases were reported in February 2019.
  • Pertussis activity increased from last month and was below the previous 5-year average.
  • 25 cases and 2 outbreaks were reported.
  • Incidence remained highest among infants <1 year old.

Measles

Hepatitis A activity increased from last month and has been above the previous 5-year average. 232 cases were reported in February 2019.
  • Measles activity increased from last month.
  • 1 case linked to international travel was reported.
  • 0% of cases had documented vaccination against measles.

Varicella

Varicella activity decreased from last month and was slightly below the previous 5-year average. 68 cases were reported in February 2019.
  • Varicella activity increased from last month and was above the previous 5-year average.
  • 90 cases and no outbreaks were reported.
  • Incidence was highest among infants <1 year old.

For all vaccine-preventable diseases, timely and complete vaccination is the best way to prevent infection. Although vaccinated individuals can still become infected with diseases like pertussis or varicella, in general, those who have received at least 1 dose of vaccine have less severe outcomes than those who have never been vaccinated for the disease.

This map shows the proportion of children ages 4–18 years with religious exemptions by county as of January 31, 2019.  Counties with a proportion of 0.3%–1.1% are: Hardee, Liberty, Glades, Hendry, Dixie, Hamilton, Bradford, Gadsden, Lafayette, Washington, Gilchrist, Jackson, Taylor, Union, Levy, Calhoun, Madison  Counties with a proportion of 1.2%–2.3% are: DeSoto, Putnam, Jefferson, Baker, Holmes, Okeechobee, Franklin, Gulf, Wakulla, Suwannee, Miami-Dade, Sumter, Nassau, Leon, Polk, Highlands, Clay  Counties with a proportion of 2.4%–3.5% are: Hillsborough, Bay, Orange, Duval, Citrus, Charlotte, Manatee, Palm Beach, Pasco, Escambia, St. Lucie, Marion, Indian River, Broward, Osceola, Santa Rosa, Lake  Counties with a proportion of 3.6%–6.6% are: Volusia, Hernando, Seminole, Lee, Alachua, Brevard, Collier, Pinellas, Okaloosa, Columbia, St. Johns, Martin, Monroe, Walton, Flagler, Sarasota

Unvaccinated children are at increased risk of vaccine-preventable diseases like pertussis and varicella. Communities with a higher proportion of religious exemptions (REs) to vaccination are at increased risk of vaccine-preventable disease transmission.

The proportion of children age 4 to 18 years with new REs is increasing each month. Statewide, the estimated prevalence of REs among children age 4 to18 years old is 3% with individual counties ranging from 0.3% to 6.6%. In March 2018, the statewide prevalence was 2.7%, and the prevalence has gradually increased each month since.

To learn more about REs at the local level, please visit www.flhealth.gov/REmap.

All REs are required to be entered into Florida SHOTS (State Health Online Tracking System), Florida’s statewide immunization registry. The map above includes REs registered in Florida SHOTS through March 31, 2019.

 

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