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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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High Blood Pressure and Preeclampsia

Contact the Maternal and Child Health Section

  •  850-245-4465
  •  

    Fax

    850-245-4047
  •  

    Mailing Address

    Maternal and Child Health Section 

    4052 Bald Cypress Way, Bin A13 

    Tallahassee, FL 32399-1721 

  • 7 Symptoms Every Pregnant Woman Should Know Video (English)
  • 7 Sintomas que Toda Mujer Embarazada Debe Conocer Video (Espanol)
7 Symptoms Every Pregnant Woman Should Know - English

Copyright © 2014 by Preeclampsia Foundation, used with permission (www.preeclampsia.org)

7 Symptoms Every Pregnant Woman Should Know - Spanish

Copyright © 2014 by Preeclampsia Foundation, used with permission (www.preeclampsia.org)

preeclampsia foundation logo

High blood pressure can cause problems for you and your unborn baby.  High blood pressure increases your risk of heart attack, stroke, blindness and kidney disease.  When you are pregnant, high blood pressure increases your chance of having complications during your pregnancy including a premature baby, a low birth weight baby or preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia usually occurs after the 20th week of pregnancy and is characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine.  If left untreated, preeclampsia can cause organ damage in the mother, preterm delivery, and can be fatal for both mother and baby.

Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy picture of a stethoscopeand getting regular prenatal care are important for the health of you and your baby.  Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle changes, and certain medications.

For more information on high blood pressure and pregnancy, visit:

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