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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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PrEP / nPEP

HIV/AIDS

HIV PrEP and nPEP Provider Map

To locate a PrEP or nPEP provider in Florida, Click Map.

 

Other PrEP provider directories:

PrEPlocator.org

PleasePrEPMe.org

PleasePrEPMe.global

 


 

PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)

 

Is a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy that involves the daily use of antiretroviral medications to reduce the risk of HIV infection in HIV-negative individuals.  In July 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada (TDF/FTC) for use as PrEP in HIV prevention in sexually active HIV–negative individuals.  PrEP should be used in conjunction with other prevention methods to reduce the risk of infection.
Acrobat reader* please note all files open in a new window and are less than 5mb in size.

 
 PrEP Provider Resources:
(All links open in a new window)

Florida DOH PrEP provider toolkits, resource guides, posters or brochures are available upon request ( Please use DiseaseControl@flhealth.gov to request a toolkit.)

 

AETC Guidelines for PrEP and PEP

 

UPHS PrEP HIV Prevention Guidelines

 

NASTAD Patient Assistance and Co-Payment Assistance Fact Sheet

 

PrEP Clinical Trials - CDC

 

AETC National Coordinating Resource Center – Prevention and Testing Guidelines

 

Updated PrEP Clinical Practice Guideline 

 

 General Audience Resources

 

PrEP Booklet for MSM-Project Inform

 

Truvada Patient Information

 

CDC PrEP Fact sheet


nPEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis)

Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) involves taking antiretroviral medications as soon as possible after a potential exposure to HIV to reduce the likelihood of HIV infection. There are two types of PEP: 1) occupational PEP, or an exposure that happens in the workplace (such as a needle stick in a healthcare setting), and 2) non-occupational PEP (nPEP), or when someone is potentially exposed to HIV through sexual intercourse or injection drug use.

*To be effective, PEP must begin with 72 hours of exposure and consists of 2-3 antiretroviral medications that must be taken for 28 days. A physician must determine what treatment is appropriate based on the nature of the exposure. Starting PEP after a potential exposure does not guarantee that someone exposed to HIV will not become infected.

 

nPEP Provider Resources:
(All links open in a new window)

Florida DOH nPEP provider toolkits, resource guides, posters or brochures are available upon ( Please use DiseaseControl@flhealth.gov to request a toolkit.)

Updated Guidelines for Antiretroviral Post-Exposure Prophylaxis After Sexual, Injection Drug Use, or Other Non-Occupational Exposure to HIV

AETC National Coordinating Resource Center – Prevention and Testing Guidelines

General Audience Resources

  CDC PEP Fact Sheet

Isentress PAP