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The Florida Department of Health works to protect, promote & improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county, & community efforts.

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Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP)

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Information on the Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Rule

Common renovation activities like sanding, cutting, and demolition can create hazardous lead dust and chips by disturbing lead-based paint, which can be harmful to adults and children.

To protect against this risk, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  (EPA) issued the Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Rule, which went into effect in April 2010.

Frequently Asked RRP Questions
Where can I find out more information about RRP?
What role do contractors and renovation professionals play in preventing childhood lead poisoning?
Who does the rule apply to?
What is a child-occupied facility?
What does the rule not cover?
Complying with the Rule
What do contractors or professional renovators need to do to comply with RRP?
I've heard some states have their own program. Does Florida?
If I have more questions about RRP, who should I contact?

Frequently Asked RRP Questions

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Where can I find out more information about RRP?

  • The EPA website has information on the different areas of RRP. There are separate sections for contactors, firms, property managers, press and the general public (especially families with small children and childcare facilities).

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What role do contractors and renovation professionals play in preventing childhood lead poisoning?

Contractors play an important role in preventing childhood lead poisoning by ensuring that lead hazards are not created during renovation, repair and painting activities in older homes. Hazards can be prevented through the use of lead safe work practices. The federal Renovation, Repair, and Paint Rule went into effect April 22, 2010 and requires training and certification in lead safe work practices for persons who perform renovation or repairs in homes, child care centers, and schools built before 1978.

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Who does the rule apply to?

The rule will affect paid renovators who work in pre-1978 housing (including multi-family housing) and child-occupied facilities. This includes: contractors, maintenance workers, painters and some other home repair trades.

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What is a child-occupied facility?

Under the rule, child-occupied facilities are defined as residential, public or commercial buildings, or portion of a building, where children under age six live or frequently visit. See the EPA Small Entity Compliance Guide for a more detailed definition.

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What does the rule not cover?

The rule does not apply to minor maintenance or repair activities where less than six square feet of lead-based paint is disturbed in a room or where less then 20 square feet of lead-based paint is disturbed on the exterior. Window replacement is not minor maintenance or repair and is included under the RRP rule.

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Complying with the Rule

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What do contractors or professional renovators need to do to comply with RRP?

1. Firms and Individuals must be certified.  To become certified, professionals must be trained and submit an application and   fee payment to EPA. Information about training and certification can be found on EPA's website.

Where can I find a training course?

  • The EPA maintains a list of training providers that have been accredited by EPA to provide training for renovators under EPA's Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP) Program.
  •  If you previously completed the required renovation training course for abatement work you may take the 4-hour refresher course instead of the 8-hour initial course from an accredited training provider to become a certified renovator.  Eligibility information

2. Supply the residents with the EPA pamphlet "Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Childcare Provider and schools." Contractors must document compliance with this requirement using EPA's pre-renovation disclosure form.

 

*Note: This page contains materials in the Portable Document Format (PDF).  The free Adobe Reader may be required to view these files.

  • Renovate Right Brochure

          In English          In Spanish

3. Workers and contractors must follow lead-safe work practices. Links to more information are provided below.

4. Those covered by RRP must keep records to show that individuals have been trained in lead-safe work practices and that you followed lead-safe work practices on the job. To make recordkeeping easier, you may use the EPA's sample recordkeeping checklist.


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I've heard some states have their own program. Does Florida?

Florida does not have its own RRP program so persons who carry out renovation and repair work on houses, child care centers, and schools built before 1978 in Florida must comply with the federal EPA RRP program.

If you work in multiple states check the EPA website to see if those states have their own RRP Programs. If so, you may need to certify through those states' RRP programs if you will be conducting work within the state.

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If I have more questions about RRP, who should I contact?

More information about RRP can be found by calling the National Lead Information Center at 1-800-424-LEAD [5323] or on the EPA's website.

EPA's Websites

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